Irving Louis Horowitz - Transaction Publishers Archives, 1939-2010

5676

Collection Overview

Title:
Irving Louis Horowitz - Transaction Publishers archives
Dates (Inclusive):
1939-2010
Creator:
Horowitz, Irving Louis
Abstract:
Irving Louis Horowitz (b. 1929), professor of sociology, was head of Transaction, a major publishing house in the social sciences. The archives include Horowitz's correspondence and publications as professor of sociology and head of Transaction, and collected papers of sociologist C. Wright Mills.
Collection Number:
5676
Size:
129.72 Cubic feet
Location:
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the  library catalog.
Repository:
Special Collections Library. Pennsylvania State University.
Languages:
English

Biographical Note

Irving Louis Horowitz (born New York City, September 25, 1929) was educated at the City College of New York (B.S., social science, 1951), Columbia University (M.A., sociology, 1952), and Brandeis University (Ph.D., sociology, 1957). After serving as Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Buenos Aires (1955-1958), he became Assistant Professor of Sociology at Bard College (1959-1960) and then Professor of Sociology and Chairman of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Hobart and William Smith College (1960-1963). He became Associate Professor of Sociology (1963-1965) and then Professor of Sociology at Washington University (1965-1969) before taking a permanent position at the new Livingston campus of Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey (1969- ) as Professor of Sociology and Chairman of the Department of Sociology. In 1978 he became the Hannah Arendt Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Political Science. Throughout his career he traveled internationally, not only through a wide-ranging involvement in diverse scholarly conferences in the social sciences and as a guest lecturer, but also as a participant in grant projects and in holding a succession of visiting professorships in the United States, Canada, Mexico, England, Argentina, Venezuela, Israel, Japan, and India.Horowitz married Ruth Lenore Narolansky in 1950. They had two children. They divorced in 1964. He married Mary Ellen Curtis in 1979.In July 1962 members of the sociology department at Washington University received a grant from the Ford Foundation to initiate the journal Trans-Action: Social Science and Modern Society, and Horowitz participated in editing its first issue of November 1963, shortly after he joined the faculty there. In 1964 he became, together with Lee Rainwater, the senior editor of Trans-Action. Later, in response to a funding crisis, Horowitz formed a consortium of professorsndash;including Howard Becker, Lee Rainwater, David Riesman, and Herbert Blumerndash;to purchase Trans-Action from Washington University in August 1968. When Horowitz moved to Rutgers the following year, he brought both Trans-Action and another journal that he edited, Studies in Comparative International Development. Trans-Action took a new name, Society, in February 1972. Horowitz remained its editor until March 1998, while continuing his involvement in its conception and development for a substantial period thereafter.Upon bringing Trans-Action magazine to Rutgers, Horowitz began publishing monographs and anthologies derived from the magazine and using the imprint Transaction. In 1973 he established Transaction Publishers, which became a major publisher in the social sciences. He served as its president until 1997, when Mary Ellen Curtis took that position, with Horowitz retaining a central role in overseeing the direction of the publishing house into the twenty-first century, by which time Transaction had published more than 5,000 titles. On July 1, 2004, Transaction acquired the social science publisher Aldine.In 1998 he created the Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy to support fellowships and research grants.The 2007 bibliography of Horowitz's publications extends to more than 800 items (not including reprints), mainly in the social sciences, but extending into the arts, publishing, and other areas, mainly in English and Spanish, but in other languages as well. His interdisciplinary scholarship encompasses a wide range of academic subjects and interestsmdash;including the sociological legacy of C. Wright Mills, Judaism in Latin America, the Holocaust and genocide, Cuban communism, American foreign policy, intellectual history, social philosophy, and sociological theory.

Return to Table of Contents


Collection Overview

This collection consists of the integrated correspondence of Irving Louis Horowitz in his dual capacity as head of Transaction Publishers and professor of sociology. Spanning a period from 1958 into the twenty-first century, these academic and corporate archives document the historical trajectory of social science research as a foundation for policy-making within advanced and developing societies. Primary source materials document the evolution of social thought, emerging methodologies, and the increasingly interdisciplinary nature of social science research. The history of publishing and marketing in the social science realm, the transformation from print culture to scholarly digital publishing, and issues involving copyright and intellectual property in the digital age are highlighted within the archives.

The scholarship of Irving Louis Horowitz is not only interwoven into the correspondence collected within the corporate archives, but also separately collected into two additional series: a general series devoted mainly to his academic typescripts and publications on such topics as Judaism in Latin America, the Holocaust and genocide, Cuban communism, American foreign policy, intellectual history, social philosophy, and sociological theory; and a specialized series on the sociologist C. Wright Mills. The papers, manuscripts, and related reference files of Mills stand alongside additional correspondence and reference materials that Horowitz collected in preparation for his book C. Wright Mills: An American Utopian (1983). Together these documents illuminate the evolution of Mills's social and cultural thought and his intellectual milieu.

The materials in this collection are located in the Pennsylvania State University Libraries, Special Collections Library, and also are accessible online at http://www.libraries.psu.edu/psul/digital/ilh.html.

Return to Table of Contents


Collection Arrangement

The Collection is organized into three series: Transaction Publishers archives, 1958-2009; Irving Louis Horowitz academic papers, 1961-2009; and C. Wright Mills papers, 1939-1984 and undated.

Series I: Transaction Publishers Archives, 1958-2009 has the following subseries, 1. Editorial and scholarly correspondence, 1958-2002, 2. Marketing, 1963-2009, 3. Photographs and drawings, 1963-1998, and 4. Cesar Grana papers, 1962-1986 and undated.

The Transaction corporate archives documents the course of social science research as a foundation for policy-making within advanced and developing societies in the latter half of the twentieth century. Primary source materials document the evolution of social thought, emerging methodologies, and the increasingly interdisciplinary nature of social science research. The history of publishing and marketing in the social science realm and the transformation from print culture to scholarly digital publishing are also highlighted within the archives.

The bulk of the first series consists of the integrated correspondence of Irving Louis Horowitz in his dual capacity as head of Transaction Publishers and professor of sociology. There are also scrapbooks of marketing materials; catalogs of Transaction and its subsidiary Aldine; a modest number of photographs, mainly of scholarly contributors from the 1960s; and a small collection of papers from the sociologist Cesar Grana, whose work Transaction published.

Sub-series 1: Editorial and Scholarly Correspondence, 1958-2005, measures 114 cubic feet, constituting the bulk of the collection. It arrangement reflects the order in which Horowitz organized all of his correspondence: (1) documents are collected into bundles spanning periods ranging from two weeks to five weeks; (2) these bundles proceed in chronological order from 1958 into the new century; (3) for the period 1958 to early March 1965, letters are in strict chronological order within bundles; (4) from mid-March 1965 onwards, bundles are organized roughly in reverse chronological order according to the date of Horowitz's reply to an incoming letter; and (5) generally, but by no means systematically, that incoming letter immediately follows Horowitz's reply. Consequently, topically related documents are widely dispersed though boxes and folders, and the only convenient entrance into the correspondence is via an electronic search.

Sub-series 1 consists of the integrated correspondence of Irving Louis Horowitz in his dual capacity as head of Transaction Publishers and professor of sociology. An alphabetical name index identifies letter writers in the earliest years, 1958-1965.

The correspondence is principally functional, documenting Horowitz's editorial and managerial activities in leading both his journals and his publishing house while simultaneously pursuing an ambitious scholarly research agenda and advancing his academic career. The correspondence incorporates many details of a personal life that was, for Horowitz, inseparable from his professional activities, and personal discussions are routinely interwoven into scholarly exchanges.

Horowitz's long-term correspondents included many influential social scientists and academicians such as Abraham Edel (who had taught and advised Horowitz at the City College of New York), Howard Becker, and Robert Merton, as well as prominent figures associated with the New Left movement and the counterculture. Among notable documents are exchanges with Ralph Miliband of the London School of Economics and Social Research (December 1962), and with A. J. Muste of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and David Dellinger of the Committee for Nonviolent Actions (various dates, January-April, 1965), together with mimeographed newsletters from Muste and Dellinger of November 1964 to January 1965 (all within the second file of January 1965), early in the Vietnam anti-war movement. Alvin W. Gouldner discusses travel in Yugoslavia (September 1965) and sociology in France (February 10, 1966) and offers an autobiographical typescript, 'Reflections on Gouldner as a Theorist' (March 1966) and a commentary on Israel (March 30 and April 6, 1966).

There is extensive correspondence on Horowitz's article on a bungled CIA intervention in Latin America, 'The Rise and Fall of Project Camelot,' including commentary from Herbert Blumer (September 13, 1965), Gouldner (September 18 and October 1, 1965), Rex D. Hopper (October 6, 1965), Pierre L. van den Berghe (October 13, 1965), and David Felix, writing to Jesse Bernard (September 23, 1966). Documents survive from a military intelligence investigation involving Horowitz and Special Agent Glendon D. Arnold, Jr. (November 1966 and January 27, 1967). Roland L. Warren, Albert K. Cohen (both September 30, 1968), and Lee Rainwater (October 7, 1968) critique Horowitz's essay 'The Struggle is the Message,' on violence in the anti-war movement.

Becker offers 'three basic analogues that sociologists use in performing their work' (January 29, 1973). Bernard comments on Horowitz's proposal for a symposium on the implications of the Democratic victory in the 1976 elections (December 19, 1976); Eugene Genovese evaluates Horowitz's essay 'Bureaucracy, Administration and State Power' (September 3, 1979). Edel and Horowitz exchange thoughts on religion, ethical relativism, and politics (June 27 and July 16, 1981). Bennett Berger analyzes the role of Transaction, at its 25th anniversary, in bringing social science to a non-professional audience (January 30, 1986). Orlando Patterson comments on the dismal state of race relations in America (May 8, 1986).

Pat Roos takes issue with Horowitz's essay 'The Decomposition of Sociology,' presenting an alternative view of current trends in the field (December 26, 1992). Peter F. Drucker discusses the Holocaust (August 5, August 6, and September 3, 1993) and Horowitz's book Three Worlds of Development (July 28, 2000). Riesman comments on Horowitz's article 'Histories, Futures, and Manifest Destiny' (November 2, 1995). The 1990s bring frequent exchanges with Merton on diverse topics.

Horowitz's multi-faceted interests and a career in publishing brought him into contact with many famous politicians, editors and journalists, intellectuals, literary figures, artists, composers, and professional athletes. This social intersection is reflected is a wide array of 'celebrity letters' contained within the archives. Carlos Fuentes sends a typescript, 'Sartre or the Refusal to Die' (October 25, 1964) and a copy of a public letter to Arthur Ochs Sulsberger protesting United States policies in Latin America and Vietnam (May 7, 1965). Dorothy Parker responds to Horowitz's suggestions regarding the social science list at Atheneum Publishers. Horowitz admires Harry Caray's skills as a baseball announcer (August 10 and 14, 1965). Robert Kennedy sends appreciations of Trans-Action magazine (September 21, 1967, and June 3, 1968, the latter two days before his assassination). The composer Lalo Schifrin responds to Horowitz's 'Notes Toward a Sociology of a Musical Style' (May 17, 1977). The composer Gunther Schuller considers various projects, including the publication of Dimitri Shostakovich's memoirs (June 16, 1980). Joan Baez sends Christmas greetings (undated [December 1980]).

United Nations Ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick thanks Horowitz for his commentary of 1982 published in the New York Times, 'Mrs. Kirkpatrick, the U.S. and the Falklands' on April 28, 1982 (April 2 and 24, 1984), and she asks to participate in a symposium on the future of the social sciences (June 21 and 22, 1984). Henry Kissinger sends a note of appreciation for Horowitz's contribution to the National Bipartisan Commission on Central America (February 10, 1984). Daniel Patrick Moynihan and Horowitz discuss Cuba (December 27, 1984, and January 7, 1985). The then Vice-President George H.W. Bush sends a thank-you note (March 19, 1986).

There are also a few unusual items of exceptional interest: a postcard of complaint from the Colorado Conservative Committee (December 5, 1965); a pre-internet version of the Nigerian financial scam, delivered via fax machine (December 1, 1995); and a eloquent letter from John McCormick to the editor of Society, responding to Robert Hauptman's criticism of McCormick's essay on bullfighting (June 13, 1997).

Sub-series 2: Marketing, 1963-2010, measures 1.75 cubic feet and consists of marketing scrapbooks; the brochure 'A General Statement of History and Policy,' providing an overview of Transaction and its subsidiary Aldine; and general and topical catalogs of publications by Transaction and Aldine.

Sub-series 3: Photographs and drawings, 1963-1998, number 45 items and consists mainly of black-and-white photographic portraits of contributors to Society magazine (1963-1966). There are also black-and-white photographs of Horowitz, his family, and unidentified others (1965 and undated); a caricature of Horowitz (undated), and color photographs of Horowitz, his wife Mary Ellen Curtis, and others (1991-1998).

Sub-series 4: Cesar Grana, 1962-1986 and undated, measures 0.2 cubic feet, and consists of papers that Horowitz obtained in 1987 from Marigay Grana, professor of sociology and widow of the sociologist Cesar Grana (1919-1986), as they collaborated on volumes of his writings published posthumously by Transaction as Meaning and Authenticity (1989) and  Fact and Symbol (1994), as well as an anthology edited by the Granas,  On Bohemia: the Code of the Self Exiled (1990). The papers include documents on William Graham Sumner and on bohemians, and correspondence from the last year of Grana's life.

Series II Irving Louis Horowitz Academic Papers, 1961-2009, includes subseries 1. Academic correspondence, 1961-1975, 2. Personal papers, 1971-2009, 3. Typescripts and research files, 1958-2001, and 4. Publications, 1948-2007.

Series II begins with small runs of academic correspondence and personal papers, but mainly consists of copies of Horowitz's scholarly writings, with typescripts and research files separated from copies of publications. These writings account for a substantial representation of more than 800 items delineated in the electronic supplement (2007) to Once More Unto the Breach, Dear Friends: Incomplete Theory and Complete Bibliography of Irving Louis Horowitz on the Occasion of his 75th Birthday, compiled by Andrew McIntosh, Patrick Ivins, and Deborah A. Berger (2005). Most significantly, the academic papers include a substantial number of unpublished typescripts, ranging from lectures to proposed anthologies, as well as several early publications that did not make their way into the complete bibliography. These typescripts and publications run the gamut of Horowitz's academic interests, including C. Wright Mills, Judaism in Latin America, the Holocaust and genocide, Cuban communism, American foreign policy, intellectual history, social philosophy, and sociological theory.

Sub-series 1: Academic correspondence, 1961-1975, measures 0.5 cubic feet, and contains correspondence separated by Horowitz from the main run of Transaction Publishers's editorial and scholarly correspondence in series I, sub-series 1, though the nature and content of these sub-series overlap to a considerable extent. Horowitz divided his academic correspondence into two segments. Academic correspondence (1961-1965, 1974-1975) includes documents on various publishing projects, requests for examination copies of books, conference announcements, travel reimbursement requests, Trans-action magazine documents, typescripts (keyed to his bibliography; see below, Appendix A), a Horowitz bibliography to 1962 (in folder 02), and diverse other personal papers. Departmental-professorial correspondence (1962-1965) includes letters of recommendation, resumes and typescripts from job applicants and colleagues, teaching materials, discussions of departmental matters, requests for examination copies of books, and diverse personal papers.

Sub-series 2: Personal papers, 1971-2009, holds a few items separated from the several bodies of correspondence: a copy of Horowitz's curriculum vitae from 1971, his certificate from Who's Who in America, and brochures from the Horowitz Foundation.

Sub-series 3: Typescripts and research files, 1958-2001, measures 3.6 cubic feet and consists mainly of typescript copies of Horowitz's scholarly writings, proceeding chronologically by year of publication and organized by numerical entry (001 to 800) according to the electronic version of his bibliography as published in 2007. In numerous instances the numerical order of the bibliography takes precedence over a strict chronological order.

Horowitz also donated among his writings a number of typescripts and research files for essays, lectures, reviews, and other projects that did not make their way into his bibliography, and some of which were never published. Each of these items has been slotted into the appropriate chronological position, further subdivided alphabetically by title within a given year or placed at the end of the listing if undated. Packets of work-in-progress or unpublished edited collections also interrupt the strict chronological flow of typescripts. Some bundles of mid-1960s writings include reviews of Horowitz's publications, and a file from 1964 holds notes on a Sociology-Anthropology seminar jointly taught by Alvin Gouldner and Horowitz.

Appendix A collects not only all of these typescripts in sub-series 2 of series III, but also additional typescripts by Horowitz appearing in sub-series 1 of series I, the Transaction Publishers editorial and scholarly correspondence; and in sub-series 4 of series III, typescripts and research files by Horowitz on C. Wright Mills. Within Appendix A, all of these titles have been keyed by number to the 2007 electronic bibliography, or inserted into the listing by title only and without number if absent from that bibliography, in order thus: roughly chronological by year, but with the numeral order of the bibliography superseding chronology; or in alphabetical order by title within a given year, for the numerous items not in the Horowitz bibliography.

Sub-series 4: Publications, 1948-2007, measures 5.7 cubic feet and consists mainly of Horowitz's scholarly publications. In many instances Horowitz preserved these writings not as singular offprints, but within bound copies of the scholarly journals in which they appeared. He also included among his archived writings a number of publications that did not make their way into the CD-ROM version of his bibliography as published in 2007. Collectively these publications are organized with the numeral order of the bibliography taking precedence over a strict chronological order; or in alphabetical order by title within a given year, for the numerous items not in the Horowitz bibliography.

In addition, Appendix B collects in this same order (numerical or alphabetical, and roughly chronological) all of the publications in sub-series 3. There are also listings and cross-references within this appendix for: (1) a number of publications collected together for an unpublished anthology; (2) a review essay of 1998 within sub-series 1 of series I, the Transaction Publishers editorial and scholarly correspondence, but absent from his bibliography of 2007; and (3) books by Horowitz that are in sub-series 7 of series III, the C. Wright Mills Papers.

Series III: C. Wright Mills Papers, 1939-1984 and undated, combines the papers of C. Wright Mills with Horowitz's papers on Mills. The series consists of correspondence, interviews, reviews, typescripts and research files, and publications. These combined papers are both linked to and explicated by further documents on Mills in the Transaction Publishers editorial and scholarly correspondence, series I, sub-series 1. Horowitz acquired the main body of these files from the Mills family following Mills's death in 1962 and expanded his collection of Mills documents as he did scholarly work on Mills into the 1980s. In addition to the separate body of Mills papers collected within Series III, correspondence pertaining to essays on Mills for a memorial volume and condolence letters to his widow Yaraslav appear within the years 1962-1963 in the Transaction Publishers general correspondence, series I, sub-series 1.

Sub-series 1: Collected correspondence with Mills and about Mills, 1939-1982 measures 0.20 cubic feet. The genesis of this sub-series may be traced through documents in the Transaction Publishers editorial and scholarly correspondence, series I, sub-series 1. In 1975 Horowitz sent a form letter to numerous scholars: 'I am currently embarking on a major study of C. Wright Mills . . . . If you have any exchange of correspondence between yourself and Mills . . .' (May 5 and May 20, 1975). Responses came from, among others, Rose K. Goldsen (June 3, 1975), Daniel Bell (August 11, 1975), and Wilson Record (see below, sub-series 6). A second round of solicitations and collection appears in 1981-1983, including source documents from George H. Callcott on Mills's time at the University of Maryland (August 10, 1981), more correspondence from Bell (August 20 and 27, September 1 and 8, and December 16, 1981), remembrances of Mills from Herbert Blumer (September 25, 1981), and a note from Horowitz to his publisher, Joyce Seltzer, that 'three new sets of Mills letters have come into my possession' (January 13, 1982). Following the publication of Horowitz's Mills biography, Bell sent another set of reflections on Mills (March 17, 1983), Record sent correspondence with Mills from 1937 (February 18 and March 2, 1984), and Harold Orbach offered reminiscences (May 11, 1984). See also reminiscences on Mills in an undated letter from Dennis Wrong to the Times Literary Supplement (circa August 1, 2000).

Further documentation of these acquisitions appears here within the present sub-series, which consists of four folders of correspondence with and about Mills as collected by Horowitz in the course of preparing his biography of Mills. The separation into four folders, and the order of their contents, reflects the state of the material as received by the Special Collections Library from Horowitz. The first folder includes correspondence with Robert Merton and Bell; reviews of and correspondence on Mills's book The Causes of World War III; and extensive dialogue among Mills, Ray Higgins, Fredrick Pike, and Donald Bray in preparation for a planned televised debate on Latin American politics with Adolph A. Berle, Jr. (Mills suffered a massive heart attack the day before the debate and was forced to withdraw). The second folder has an annotated typescript of Horowitz's essay 'The Causes of C. Wright Mills'; reviews of and correspondence on The Causes of World War III and Listen Yankee; and a copy of Mills's file from the University of Wisconsin graduate school. The third collects correspondence with Merton, Bell, Howard Becker, T. C. McCormick, Lionel Trilling, Theodore Abel, Hans Gerth, and others, as well as a history of the Department of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin. The last folder has further correspondence with Merton and McCormick; correspondence on several of Mills's writings, including especially the book White Collar and the lecture series that he did for the BBC early in 1959; and correspondence, mainly from 1968, concerning Wilson Record and his remembrances of Mills. Interspersed within this last segment are earlier letters to and from Mills, including further correspondence on his books, a letter of 1961 to Carlos Fuentes, and an undated draft of a letter to his daughter Pamela.

For additional correspondence pertaining to White Collar and other books by Mills, see below, sub-series 3. Reviews

Sub-series 2: Interviews, 1960-1961, measures 0.10 cubic feet and consists of an interview of Mills conducted by Victor Flores Olea, Carlos Fuentes, and Jaime Garcia Terres in Mexico City in 1960; and Mills's annotated typescript of his comments on the Cuban revolution from an interview conducted in Mexico on July 14, 1961 under the title 'Listen Again, Yankee: 1961.'

Sub-series 3: Reviews, 1948-1961 and undated measures 0.55 cubic feet and consists of press clippings of reviews of The New Men of Power, The Puerto Rican Journey (co-authored with Rose Kohn and Clarence Senior),  From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology (co-edited with Hans Gerth),  Character and Social Structure (co-authored with Gerth), and other publications and lectures by Mills; and press clippings and correspondence on his books  White Collar, The Power Elite, and  The Sociological Imagination. These files are organized chronologically according to the earliest date in each distinct segment.

Sub-series 4: Typescripts and research files by Mills, 1939 - circa 1973 and undated, measures 1.60 cubic feet and collects Mills's heavily annotated typescripts and research files. This portion of his papers has evidently undergone several stages of arrangement and re-arrangement, as Mills himself transferred documents from one gathering to another in preparation for a new project, and as Horowitz re-gathered the papers in preparation for his anthology of Mills's writings and in preparation for his biography of Mills.

This overall organization is chronological by year and alphabetical by title within years. Unlike the correspondence (above, sub-series 1), which appears as received from Horowitz, this segment of the papers has been substantially reorganized, insofar as it was possible to identify manuscripts that could be separated into individual files and presented in chronological order, with undated documents following toward the end of the sub-series. However, there are some bundles of papers that have been left as received from Horowitz, even if their unity and identity is unclear, on the theory that scholars might uncover threads. Thus, for example, there are five folders of papers predominantly on Mills's study of intellectuals, but with other and perhaps unrelated topics interspersed among those pages clearly pertaining to the subject of intellectuals; these five folders appear within the general chronological run according to the earliest dated item in each bundle. Other more ambiguous and largely unidentified gatherings of documents appear at the end of the sub-series, following the folders on specific but undated items.

In addition to these essays, correspondence of August 1962 in series I, sub-series 1, includes an annotated 11-page essay by Mills titled, 'The Big City: Private Troubles and Public Issues,' following a cover letter of August 9, 1962, to Horowitz from Ian Ballantine of Ballantine Books, and carrying the note 'typed from Wright's original.' For a comprehensive bibliography of Mills prepared by Horowitz in 1962, see 'Writings, 1961-1962' in series II, sub-series 3, folder 24.

Sub-series 5: Typescripts and research files on Mills by Horowitz, 1964-1984 and undated measures 0.69 cubic feet and collects some of Horowitz's writings on Mills, separated from the general run of writings by Horowitz that constitutes the bulk of series II; he did not separate all such writings, some of which remain within series II. The files in sub-series 5 of the C. Wright Mills Papers are organized chronologically. His typescript of collected addresses and lectures by Mills (folders 16-18) presents edited versions of many typescripts by Mills in sub-series 4.

Sub-series 6: Typescripts and research files on Mills by others, 1978-1995, measures 0.20 cubic feet and consists of memoirs by the sociologists Wilson Record and William Form. Correspondence in series I, sub-series 1, traces the genesis of these documents. Record, a professor at Portland State University, dictated his reminiscences of Mills and sent the tapes to Horowitz's secretary for transcription in 1975. This untitled document then went through stages of revision, from which Horowitz retained two copies of an undated version, as well as a version dated February 20, 1978. The latter is pieced together from different drafts and includes a heavily annotated section; it also includes two supplemental essays. In his memoir Record recalls his long association with Mills as a fellow student and professor, describes their personal and professional relationships, and discusses the possible influences of their teachers and peers. Record considers Mills's intellectual outlook, speculating on the genesis of these beliefs, and he cites his recurring and unsuccessful attempts to persuade Mills to carry intellectual positions into action in the areas of civil rights and radical politics. In an undated supplemental essay, Record takes issue with Horowitz's essay on Mills and his mentors at the University of Texas. In another supplemental essay, dated March 22, 1979, Record recalls Mills as a compulsive thief who admired gangsters, and in concluding he offers a wry comment: 'organized crime lost to sociology a man with tremendous promise.'

In a letter of February 15, 1995, professor William Form presented Horowitz with a typescript copy of reminiscences of his experiences with Mills during his years as Mills's graduate student at the University of Maryland in the early 1940s. Form published his essay: 'Mills at Maryland,' The entity from which ERIC acquires the content, including journal, organization, and conference names, or by means of online submission from the author. American Sociologist 26/3 (1995), 40-67.

Sub-series 7: Books by Mills, on Mills, and on Mills's colleagues, 1948-1989, contains 18 books and is divided into three segments, each in chronological order by date of first printing: books by Mills; books by Horowitz on Mills; books by others on Mills and on Mills's colleagues at Columbia University.

Return to Table of Contents


Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research. Restrictions, where applicable, are noted at the series, subseries, or file levels.

Copyright Notice

Copyright is retained by the creators of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Irving Louis Horowitz - Transaction Publishers Archives, HCLA 5676, Special Collections Library, Pennsylvania State University.

Processing Information

Processed by Special Collections staff.

Return to Table of Contents


Controlled Access Headings

Genre(s)

  • Photographic
  • Scrapbooks

Personal Name(s)

  • Horowitz, Irving Louis

Return to Table of Contents


Collection Inventory

Click associated checkboxes to select items to request. When you have finished, click the Submit Request button.

Box

1

2

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

50

51

52

53

54

55

56

57

58

59

60

61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

70

71

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

79

80

81

82

83

84

85

86

87

88

89

90

91

92

93

94

95

96

97

98

99

100

101

102

103

104

105

106

107

108

109

127

128

129

130

131

132

163

164

165

166

167

168

169

170

171

172

173

174

175

176

177

Box

110

110

110

110

110

110

126

Box

Conditions Governing Access note

Yes

124

Conditions Governing Access note

Yes

124

Conditions Governing Access note

Yes

124

Conditions Governing Access note

Yes

124

Box

110

110

110

Return to Table of Contents


Box

111

111

Box

111

111

111

111

111

Box

111

111

111

111

111

111

111

111

111

111

111

111

111

111

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

112

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

113

114

114

114

114

114

114

114

114

114

114

114

114

114

114

114

114

114

114

114

Box

110

110

114

114

114

114

114

114

114

114

114

115

115

115

116

116

116

117

118

119

119

119

119

119

119

119

119

123

125

125

125

126

Return to Table of Contents


Box

120

Box

120

120

Box

120

120

120

120

120

Box

120

120

120

120

120

120

120

120

120

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

121

122

122

122

122

122

122

122

122

122

122

122

122

122

Box

122

122

122

122

122

125

Box

123

123

Box

123

123

123

123

123

123

123

123

123

123

123

123

123

123

Return to Table of Contents


Return to Table of Contents